Legislative Report

ACSS monitors legislative activity that affects members. We maintain a current list of bills and measures that we either sponsor, support, oppose, or are simply keeping a close watch over. Read the legislative activity in its entirety on this page, or download the PDF version:

 Legislative Activity Report (Updated July 11, 2022)

 


 

ACSS Legislative Report

7/11/2022

   

 

Co-Sponsor

 

AB 1714

(Cooper D)   Excluded employees: binding arbitration.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 1/26/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/26/2022

 

Status: 6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 11. Noes 0.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/22/2022-S. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/1/2022  10 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 2200  SENATE APPROPRIATIONS, PORTANTINO, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law, the Bill of Rights for State Excluded Employees, permits, among other things, excluded employee organizations to represent their excluded members in their employment relations, including grievances, with the state. That law defines excluded employees as all managerial employees, confidential employees, supervisory employees, and specified employees of the Department of Personnel Administration, the Department of Finance, the Controller’s office, the Legislative Counsel Bureau, the Bureau of State Audits, the Public Employment Relations Board, the Department of Industrial Relations, and the State Athletic Commission.This bill would enact the Excluded Employee Arbitration Act to permit an employee organization that represents an excluded employee who has filed certain grievances with the Department of Human Resources to request binding arbitration of the grievance if specified conditions are met. The bill would require the designation of a standing panel of arbitrators and, under specified circumstances, the provision of arbitrators from the California State Mediation and Conciliation Service within the Public Employment Relations Board. The bill would then require the arbitrator to be chosen in a specified manner and would prescribe the duties of that arbitrator. This bill contains other related provisions.

 

 

Memo:

 

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Author -- 01/31/22

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Asm. PE&R -- 02/04/22

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Asm. JUD -- 02/04/22

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Asm. APPR-- 04/05/22

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Sen. LPE&R -- 06/08/22

 

SB 1406

(Durazo D)   Excluded employees: binding arbitration.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 2/18/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/18/2022

 

Status: 6/28/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To consent calendar. (Ayes 11. Noes 0.) (June 28). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/28/2022-A. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/3/2022  9 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 1100  ASSEMBLY APPROPRIATIONS, HOLDEN, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law, the Bill of Rights for State Excluded Employees, permits, among other things, excluded employee organizations to represent their excluded members in their employment relations, including grievances, with the state. That law defines excluded employees as all managerial employees, confidential employees, supervisory employees, and specified employees of the Department of Personnel Administration, the Department of Finance, the Controller’s office, the Legislative Counsel Bureau, the Bureau of State Audits, the Public Employment Relations Board, the Department of Industrial Relations, and the State Athletic Commission.This bill would enact the Excluded Employee Arbitration Act to permit an employee organization that represents an excluded employee who has filed certain grievances with the Department of Human Resources to request binding arbitration of the grievance if specified conditions are met. The bill would require the designation of a standing panel of arbitrators and, under specified circumstances, the provision of arbitrators from the California State Mediation and Conciliation Service within the Public Employment Relations Board. The bill would then require the arbitrator to be chosen in a specified manner and would prescribe the duties of that arbitrator. This bill contains other related provisions.

 

 

Memo:

 

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Author -- 04/12/22

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Sen. JUD -- 04/12/22

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Sen. LPE&R -- 04/14/22

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Sen. APPR -- 4/28/22

Co-Sponsor letter sent to Asm. JUD -- 6/23/22

 

Support

 

AB 316

(Cooper D)   State employees: under-represented groups.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/23/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/25/2021

 

Last Amend: 6/23/2022

 

Status: 6/27/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.

 

Location: 6/27/2022-S. THIRD READING

 

Summary: Existing law, the State Civil Services Act, requires each state agency to establish an equal opportunity plan which includes, at a minimum, identifying the areas of significant underutilization of specific groups based on race, ethnicity, and gender, within each department and job category level, as provided. This bill would require that each agency, prior to January 1, 2024, and once every 2 years thereafter, establish a plan to recruit, attract, and retain employees identified as belonging to these underutilized groups. The bill would further require that the Department of Human Resources, by January 1, 2024, develop and implement a monitoring and compliance program to address deficiencies, and provide guidance and recommendations. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

Memo:

 

Support letter sent to Author -- 4/13/20

Support letter sent to Asm. PE&R -- 4/13/20

Support letter sent to Asm. APPR -- 4/23/20

Support letter sent to Sen. LPE&R -- 6/11/21

Support letter sent to Sen. APPR -- 8/16/21

 

ACR 190

(Jones-Sawyer D)   Juneteenth.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 5/12/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 5/12/2022

 

Status: 6/30/2022-From committee: Ordered to third reading.

 

Location: 6/30/2022-S. THIRD READING

 

Summary: This measure would recognize June 19, 2022, as Juneteenth and would urge the people of California to join in celebrating Juneteenth as a day to honor and reflect on the significant role that African Americans have played in the history of the United States and how they have enriched society through their steadfast commitment to promoting unity and equality.

 

 

SB 114

(Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review)   Employment: COVID-19: supplemental paid sick leave.

 

Current Text: Chaptered: 2/9/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/8/2021

 

Last Amend: 2/2/2022

 

Status: 2/9/2022-Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 4, Statutes of 2022.

 

Location: 2/9/2022-S. CHAPTERED

 

Summary: Existing law, the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014, entitles an employee who works in California for the same employer for 30 or more days within a year from the commencement of employment to paid sick days. Under existing law, an employee accrues paid sick days at a rate of not less than one hour per every 30 hours worked, subject to certain use, accrual, and yearly carryover limitations. Existing law requires the Labor Commissioner to enforce the act and provides for procedures, including investigation and hearing, and for remedies and penalties.This bill, beginning January 1, 2022, until September 30, 2022, would provide for COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave for covered employees who are unable to work or telework due to certain reasons related to COVID-19, including that the employee is attending a COVID-19 vaccine or vaccine booster appointment for themselves or a family member, or is experiencing symptoms, or caring for a family member experiencing symptoms, related to a COVID-19 vaccine or vaccine booster. The bill would entitle a covered employee to 40 hours of COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave if that employee works full time or was scheduled to work, on average, at least 40 hours per week for the employer in the 2 weeks preceding the date the covered employee took COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave. The bill would provide a different calculation for supplemental paid sick leave for a covered employee who is a firefighter subject to certain work schedule requirements and for a covered employee working fewer or variable hours, as specified. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

SB 117

(Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review)   State employment: State Bargaining Units: memoranda of understanding: addenda.

 

Current Text: Chaptered: 2/9/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/8/2021

 

Last Amend: 2/2/2022

 

Status: 2/9/2022-Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 6, Statutes of 2022.

 

Location: 2/9/2022-S. CHAPTERED

 

Summary: Existing law provides that a provision of a memorandum of understanding reached between the state employer and a recognized employee organization representing state civil service employees that requires the expenditure of funds does not become effective unless approved by the Legislature in the annual Budget Act. Existing law requires the Department of Human Resources to provide a memorandum of understanding to the Legislative Analyst who then has 10 calendar days from the date the tentative agreement is received to issue a fiscal analysis to the Legislature. Existing law prohibits the memorandum of understanding from being subject to legislative determination until either the Legislative Analyst has presented a fiscal analysis of the memorandum of understanding or until 10 calendar days has elapsed since the memorandum was received by the Legislative Analyst. This bill, notwithstanding the above provisions, would approve provisions of agreements entered into between the state employer and State Bargaining Units 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, and 13. The bill would provide that the provisions of the addenda included above that require the expenditure of funds will not take effect unless funds for these provisions are specifically appropriated by the Legislature. The bill would authorize the state employer or these state bargaining units to reopen negotiations if funds for these provisions are not specifically appropriated by the Legislature. The bill would require the provisions of these agreements that require the expenditure of funds to become effective even if the provisions are approved by the Legislature in legislation other than the annual Budget Act. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

SB 835

(Newman D)   Employee benefits: Legislature: employees and officers: benefits.

 

Current Text: Amended: 3/15/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/6/2022

 

Last Amend: 3/15/2022

 

Status: 6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To consent calendar. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (June 22). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/22/2022-A. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/3/2022  9 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 1100  ASSEMBLY APPROPRIATIONS, HOLDEN, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law grants state employees certain health, dental, and vision benefits, and authorizes other public agencies, including the Legislature, to elect to contract for these benefits. Existing law, which is applicable to certain state employees, requires the state employer, upon the death of an employee while in state service, to continue to pay employer contributions for health, dental, and vision benefits for a period not to exceed 120 days, as specified. Existing law also requires in this context that the state employer provide certain information and notifications to surviving spouses and other eligible family members.This bill would require the Legislature, upon the death of a legislative employee while in service, to continue to pay employer contributions for health benefits for a period not to exceed 120 days, as specified, to the extent the benefits have been elected. The bill would specify, for these purposes, that the employer is the Senate or the Assembly, as may be applicable, and would identify the entities responsible for providing certain advisements to surviving spouses and other eligible family members.

 

 

Memo:

 

Support letter sent to Author -- 4/7/22

Support letter sent to Sen. LPE&R -- 4/7/22

Support letter sent to Sen. APPR -- 4/28/22

 

SCR 109

(Bradford D)   Juneteenth.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 5/19/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 5/19/2022

 

Status: 6/30/2022-From committee: Be adopted. Ordered to consent calendar. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (June 30).

 

Location: 6/30/2022-A. CONSENT CALENDAR

 

Summary: This measure would recognize June 19, 2022, as Juneteenth and would urge the people of California to join in celebrating Juneteenth as a day to honor and reflect on the significant role that African Americans have played in the history of the United States and how they have enriched society through their steadfast commitment to promoting unity and equality.

 

 

Watch

 

AB 551

(Rodriguez D)   Disability retirement: COVID-19: presumption.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/28/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/10/2021

 

Last Amend: 6/28/2022

 

Status: 6/29/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.

 

Location: 6/29/2022-S. THIRD READING

 

Summary: Existing law, until January 1, 2023, establishes a disability retirement presumption that is applicable to the members of various public employee retirement systems who are employed in certain firefighter, public safety officer, and health care job classifications, among others, who test positive for COVID-19, as specified. Existing law requires, if the member retires for disability on the basis, in whole or in part, of a COVID-19-related illness, that it be presumed that the disability arose out of, or in the course of, the member’s employment, unless rebutted. This bill would extend the operation of the provisions described above until January 1, 2024.

 

 

AB 1041

(Wicks D)   Employment: leave.

 

Current Text: Amended: 9/3/2021  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/18/2021

 

Last Amend: 9/3/2021

 

Status: 9/10/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(15). (Last location was INACTIVE FILE on 9/9/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)

 

Location: 9/10/2021-S. 2 YEAR

 

Summary: (1)Existing law, commonly known as the California Family Rights Act, makes it an unlawful employment practice for any government employer or employer with 5 or more employees to refuse to grant a request by any employee with more than 12 months of service with the employer, and who has at least 1,250 hours of service with the employer during the previous 12-month period or who meets certain other requirements, to take up to a total of 12 workweeks in any 12-month period to, among other things, bond with a new child of the employee or to care for themselves or a child, parent, grandparent, grandchild, sibling, spouse, or domestic partner, as specified.This bill would expand the population that an employee can take leave to care for to include a designated person. The bill would define "designated person" to mean a person identified by the employee at the time the employee requests family care and medical leave. The bill would authorize an employer to limit designation of a person, as prescribed. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

AB 1624

(Ting D)   Budget Act of 2022.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 1/10/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/10/2022

 

Status: 1/20/2022-Referred to Com. on BUDGET.

 

Location: 1/10/2022-A. BUDGET

 

Summary: This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 fiscal year. This bill contains other related provisions.

 

 

AB 1722

(Cooper D)   Public employees’ retirement: safety members: industrial disability retirement.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 1/27/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/27/2022

 

Status: 6/29/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (June 29). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/29/2022-S. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/1/2022  10 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 2200  SENATE APPROPRIATIONS, PORTANTINO, Chair

 

Summary: The Public Employees’ Retirement Law, until January 1, 2023, provides a state safety member of the Public Employees’ Retirement System who retires for industrial disability a retirement benefit equal to the greatest amount resulting from 3 possible calculations. In this regard, the benefit amount is based on an actuarially reduced service retirement, a service retirement allowance, if the member is qualified, or 50% of the member’s final compensation, plus an annuity purchased with their accumulated contributions, if any. Existing law establishes the Public Employees’ Retirement Fund, which is a trust fund that is appropriated continuously for various purposes, including the payment of benefits.This bill would delete the termination of these provisions on January 1, 2023, thereby making them operative in perpetuity. By providing that a continuously appropriated fund may be spent for a new purpose, this bill would make an appropriation. The bill also would make nonsubstantive style changes.

 

 

AB 1751

(Daly D)   Workers’ compensation: COVID-19: critical workers.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 2/1/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/1/2022

 

Status: 6/29/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 4. Noes 1.) (June 29). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/29/2022-S. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/1/2022  10 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 2200  SENATE APPROPRIATIONS, PORTANTINO, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee, as defined, for injuries sustained in the course of employment. Existing law creates a disputable presumption that specified injuries sustained in the course of employment of a specified member of law enforcement or a specified first responder arose out of and in the course of the employment. Existing law governs the procedures for filing a claim for workers’ compensation, including filing a claim form, and provides that an injury is presumed compensable if liability is not rejected within 90 days after the claim form is filed, as specified. Existing case law provides for how certain presumptions may be rebutted. Existing law defines "injury" for an employee to include illness or death resulting from the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) under specified circumstances, until January 1, 2023. Existing law create a disputable presumption, as specified, that the injury arose out of and in the course of the employment and is compensable, for specified dates of injury. Existing law requires an employee to exhaust their paid sick leave benefits and meet specified certification requirements before receiving any temporary disability benefits or, for police officers, firefighters, and other specified employees, a leave of absence. Existing law also make a claim relating to a COVID-19 illness presumptively compensable, as described above, after 30 days or 45 days, rather than 90 days. Existing law, until January 1, 2023, allows for a presumption of injury for all employees whose fellow employees at their place of employment experience specified levels of positive testing, and whose employer has 5 or more employees.This bill would extend the above-described provisions relating to COVID-19 until January 1, 2025. This bill contains other existing laws.

 

 

AB 1768

(Cooper D)   State employees: active duty compensation and benefits.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 2/2/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/2/2022

 

Status: 6/29/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (June 28). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/28/2022-S. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/1/2022  10 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 2200  SENATE APPROPRIATIONS, PORTANTINO, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law grants the right to certain compensation and benefits to state employees who, as members of the California National Guard or a United States military reserve organization, are ordered to active duty by Presidential determination, as specified, or in time of national emergency declared by the President of the United States or otherwise authorized by law. Existing law references specific provisions of federal law for purposes of identifying events that establish how long the affected state employees are required to receive these compensation and benefits, a period which is not to exceed 180 calendar days.This bill, for purposes of the above-described provisions, would delete the references to federal law. For purposes of establishing how long the affected state employees are required to receive these active duty compensation and benefits, the bill would refer instead to the provisions of California law that generally establish the right of state employees to compensation and benefits while on active duty, as described above. The bill would make other nonsubstantive changes.

 

 

AB 1801

(Nazarian D)   State holidays: Genocide Remembrance Day.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/20/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/7/2022

 

Last Amend: 6/20/2022

 

Status: 6/29/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (June 29). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/29/2022-S. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/1/2022  10 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 2200  SENATE APPROPRIATIONS, PORTANTINO, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law designates specific days as holidays in this state. Existing law designates holidays on which community colleges and public schools are authorized to close pursuant to a memorandum of understanding between the governing board and represented employees, including “Native American Day” on the 4th Friday in September. Existing law entitles state employees, with specified exceptions, to be given time off with pay for specified holidays. This bill would add April 24, known as “Genocide Remembrance Day,” to the list of state holidays. The bill would authorize community colleges and public schools to close on April 24, known as “Genocide Remembrance Day,” as specified. The bill would authorize state employees to elect to take time off with pay in recognition of “Genocide Remembrance Day,” as specified.

 

 

AB 1824

(Committee on Public Employment and Retirement)   Public employees’ retirement.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/30/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/7/2022

 

Last Amend: 6/30/2022

 

Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/29/2022-S. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/1/2022  10 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 2200  SENATE APPROPRIATIONS, PORTANTINO, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law, the Teachers’ Retirement Law (TRL), establishes the State Teachers’ Retirement System (STRS) and creates the Defined Benefit Program of the State Teachers’ Retirement Plan, which provides a defined benefit to members of the program, based on final compensation, creditable service, and age at retirement, subject to certain variations. STRS is administered by the Teachers’ Retirement Board. Existing law creates the Cash Balance Benefit Program, which is administered by the board, to provide a retirement plan for the benefit of participating employees who provide creditable service for less than 50% of full time. This bill would revise the description of trustee service to link it to the definition of this service, which means duties performed by a member of the governing body of an employer. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

AB 1949

(Low D)   Employees: bereavement leave.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/30/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/10/2022

 

Last Amend: 6/30/2022

 

Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/29/2022-S. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/1/2022  10 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 2200  SENATE APPROPRIATIONS, PORTANTINO, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law, commonly known as the California Family Rights Act, which is a part of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act, makes it an unlawful employment practice for an employer, as defined, to refuse to grant a request by an eligible employee to take up to 12 workweeks of unpaid protected leave during any 12-month period for family care and medical leave, as specified.This bill would additionally make it an unlawful employment practice for an employer to refuse to grant a request by an eligible employee to take up to 5 days of bereavement leave upon the death of a family member, as defined. The bill would require that leave be completed within 3 months of the date of death. The bill would require that leave be taken pursuant to any existing bereavement leave policy of the employer. Under the bill, in the absence of an existing policy, the bereavement leave would be unpaid, however, the bill would authorize an employee to use certain other leave balances otherwise available to the employee, including accrued and available paid sick leave.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

AB 2133

(Medina D)   Wages: final payments.

 

Current Text: Amended: 3/23/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/15/2022

 

Last Amend: 3/23/2022

 

Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.

 

Location: 6/30/2022-S. THIRD READING

 

Summary: Existing law regulates the terms and conditions of employment, and, specifically, the payment of wages. Existing law generally requires that if an employer discharges an employee, the wages earned and unpaid at the time of discharge are due and payable immediately. Under existing law, an employer who lays off a group of seasonal employees, as specified, is deemed to have made immediate payment of the employees’ wages if the wages are paid within a reasonable time as may be necessary for their computation and payment, provided that the time may not exceed 72 hours. This bill would reduce the time limit on the payment of wages, as described above, to 48 hours.

 

 

AB 2443

(Cooley D)   Public employees’ retirement: federal law: limitation on benefits.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/22/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/17/2022

 

Last Amend: 6/22/2022

 

Status: 6/29/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (June 29). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/29/2022-S. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/1/2022  10 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 2200  SENATE APPROPRIATIONS, PORTANTINO, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law establishes the Legislators’ Retirement System, Public Employees’ Retirement System, the Judges’ Retirement System, and the Judges’ Retirement System II, all of which provide retirement and other benefits to their respective members and are administered by the Board of Administration of the Public Employees’ Retirement System. Existing federal law prescribes limits on the amount of retirement benefits that a member may receive if a retirement system is to maintain its tax-qualified status and may require that benefits from different retirement plans maintained by the same employer be aggregated. This bill, for purposes of the above-described retirement systems, would prescribe the method by which benefits are to be reduced when federal law requires aggregation of benefits from different plans maintained by the same employer and federal limits on benefits are reached. The bill would make findings and declarations regarding the intent of the Legislature to address the Judges’ Retirement System II, as specified.

 

 

AB 2493

(Chen R)   County employees’ retirement: disallowed compensation: benefit adjustments.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/30/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/17/2022

 

Last Amend: 6/30/2022

 

Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Ordered to third reading.

 

Location: 6/30/2022-S. THIRD READING

 

Summary: (1)Existing law, the California Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act of 2013 (PEPRA), generally requires a public retirement system, as defined, to modify its plan or plans to comply with the act. PEPRA, among other things, establishes new defined benefit formulas and caps on pensionable compensation.This bill would require a retirement system established under CERL, upon determining that the compensation reported for a sworn peace officer or firefighter is disallowed compensation, to require the employer, as defined, to discontinue reporting the disallowed compensation. The bill would require, for an active sworn peace officer or firefighter, the retirement system to credit all contributions made on the disallowed compensation against future contributions to the benefit of the employer that reported the disallowed compensation, and return any contribution paid by, or on behalf of, that member, to the member by the employer that reported the disallowed compensation, except in certain circumstances in which a system has already initiated recalculating compensation. The bill would require the system, for a retired sworn peace officer or firefighter, survivor, or beneficiary whose final compensation was predicated upon the disallowed compensation, to credit the contributions made on the disallowed compensation against future contributions, to the benefit of the employer that reported the disallowed compensation, and to permanently adjust the benefit of the affected retired member, survivor, or beneficiary to reflect the exclusion of the disallowed compensation. The bill would establish other conditions required to be satisfied with respect to a retired sworn peace officer or firefighter, survivor, or beneficiary when final compensation was predicated upon disallowed compensation, including, among others, requiring a specified payment to be made by the employer that reported contributions on the disallowed compensation to the retired member, survivor, or beneficiary, as appropriate. The bill would authorize a retirement system that has initiated a process prior to July 1, 2022, to permanently adjust the benefit of the affected retired member, survivor, or beneficiary to reflect the exclusion of the disallowed compensation to use that system in lieu of specified provisions that the bill would enact. The bill would also require certain information regarding the relevant retired member, survivor, or beneficiary needed for purposes of these provisions to be kept confidential by the recipient.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

SB 154

(Skinner D)   Budget Act of 2022.

 

Current Text: Chaptered: 6/27/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/8/2021

 

Last Amend: 6/8/2022

 

Status: 6/27/2022-Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 43, Statutes of 2022.

 

Location: 6/27/2022-S. CHAPTERED

 

Summary: This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 fiscal year. This bill contains other related provisions.

 

 

SB 422

(Pan D)   Personal services contracts: state employees: physician and professional registry.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 2/12/2021  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/12/2021

 

Status: 9/10/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(15). (Last location was INACTIVE FILE on 9/9/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)

 

Location: 9/10/2021-A. 2 YEAR

 

Summary: Existing law, the State Civil Service Act, regulates employment with the state and vests in the Department of Human Resources all powers, duties, and authority necessary to operate the state civil service system. Existing law permits the use of personal services contracts for purposes of cost savings when specified conditions are met, including when the potential economic advantage of contracting is not outweighed by the public’s interest in having a particular function performed directly by the state government.This bill would require the Department of Human Resources to establish, by March 1, 2022, a physician and professional registry composed of prescribed members of state bargaining units who are employed by the state. The bill would require the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the State Department of State Hospitals to participate in the registry and to designate a coordinator for the registry. The bill would require an employee in the applicable bargaining units who elects to join the registry to notify the coordinator of their interest and provide the coordinator with their availability for work on a monthly basis. The bill would establish eligibility and compensation for registry work. The bill would require each state department employing physicians or professionals from the registry, by January 1, 2026, to conduct a study of the effectiveness of the registry to determine if the registry compensation rates were successful in addressing the operational needs for flexible services at a lower cost than contract registries. The bill would also require each such department to conduct and post on its internet website a semiannual survey of managers and employees to determine the efficacy of the registry. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2027.

 

 

SB 457

(Portantino D)   Personal income taxes: credit: reduction in vehicles.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/21/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/16/2021

 

Last Amend: 6/21/2022

 

Status: 6/30/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 10. Noes 1.) (June 30). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/30/2022-A. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/3/2022  9 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 1100  ASSEMBLY APPROPRIATIONS, HOLDEN, Chair

 

Summary: The Personal Income Tax Law allows various credits against the taxes imposed by the law. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2023, and before January 1, 2028, allow a credit against those taxes in an amount of $2,500 for each household member, as defined, that exceeds the number of registered vehicles, as defined, and would limit the amount of the credit allowed to $7,500. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

SB 840

(Skinner D)   Budget Act of 2022.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 1/10/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 1/10/2022

 

Status: 1/11/2022-From printer.

 

Location: 1/10/2022-S. BUDGET & F.R.

 

Summary: This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 fiscal year. This bill contains other related provisions.

 

 

SB 1044

(Durazo D)   Employers: state of emergency or emergency condition: retaliation.

 

Current Text: Amended: 6/29/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/15/2022

 

Last Amend: 6/29/2022

 

Status: 6/29/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

 

Location: 6/27/2022-A. APPR.

 

Calendar: 8/3/2022  9 a.m. - 1021 O Street, Room 1100  ASSEMBLY APPROPRIATIONS, HOLDEN, Chair

 

Summary: Existing law establishes within the Department of Industrial Relations the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement, under the direction of the Labor Commissioner. Existing law authorizes the division to enforce the Labor Code and all labor laws of the state the enforcement of which is not specifically vested in any other officer, board, or commission. Existing law prescribes comprehensive requirements relating to minimum wages, overtime compensation, and standards for working conditions for the protection of employees applicable to an employment relationship.This bill would prohibit an employer, in the event of a state of emergency or an emergency condition, as defined, from taking or threatening adverse action against any employee for refusing to report to, or leaving, a workplace within the affected area because the employee feels unsafe, except as specified. The bill would also prohibit an employer from preventing any employee, including employees of public entities, as specified, from accessing the employee’s mobile device or other communications device for seeking emergency assistance, assessing the safety of the situation, or communicating with a person to confirm their safety. The bill would require an employee to notify the employer of the state of emergency or emergency condition requiring the employee to leave or refuse to report to the workplace, as specified. The bill would clarify that these provisions are not intended to apply when a declared official state of emergency remains in place but emergency conditions that pose an imminent and ongoing risk of harm to the workplace, the worker, or the worker’s home have ceased.

 

 

SB 1114

(Newman D)   Public Employees’ Retirement System.

 

Current Text: Introduced: 2/16/2022  html   pdf

 

Introduced: 2/16/2022

 

Status: 2/23/2022-Referred to Com. on RLS.

 

Location: 2/16/2022-S. RLS.

 

Summary: The Public Employees’ Retirement Law (PERL) creates the Public Employees’ Retirement System (PERS), which provides a defined benefit to its members based on age at retirement, service credit, and final compensation, and prescribes the rate of employer contributions to PERS. Under PERL, an "employer" is defined for certain purposes generally to mean a contracting agency, except as specified. This bill would make a nonsubstantive change to that definition.

 

Total Measures: 26

Total Tracking Forms: 26